Friday, July 3, 2015

Shotgun LovesongsShotgun Lovesongs by Nickolas Butler
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Just great storytelling-----about a group of high school friends and the changes in their relationships as they get older. It is a sentimental and poignant story about ordinary people in ordinary lives made extraordinary in the telling.

Told in interesting first-person narratives of each major character addressing the reader as “you” which lends itself to an intimate, confessional relationship between character and reader. These characters are multidimensional and every detail, the time, location and events of the story are finely wrought and realized.

In the end, Butler manages to say important things about growing up and what that means and maybe about America itself.

Audio Version is great - performance of the readers is just very enjoyable.

Favorite quote:
" I tell my children when you are caught in a lie, or when you do something wrong, just STOP. Don't make excuses. Don't keep talking. Don't try to explain yourself. Just own up to what you've done wrong. when you do that, things inevitably work out better. You LOOK and FEEL better. More likely than not, you also catch the other person off guard."

View all my reviews
The Winslow BoyThe Winslow Boy by Terence Rattigan
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

This excellent stage play is based on an actual incident in the Edwardian era, which took place at the Royal Naval College, Osborne, England. Before he took the case, the barrister who was to represent him subjected the boy to questioning to test his story, only accepting once he had satisfied himself of the boy's innocence.

The theme of the lawsuit was "Let Right be Done" which recognizes the operative principle that what is legal does not mean it is right.
If Sir Robert Morton were to appear in the courts today I wonder if his ringing cry for right would move the hardened hearts of the justice
system.

Favorite quote(s):
Sir Robert Morton
“I have a point of order, Mr. Speaker. . . I will not yield. . .You shall not side with the great against the powerless. . . Have you heard those words, gentlemen? Do you recognize their source? From that same source I add this injunction. It is this: what you do to the least of them you do to me.”



View all my reviews

Wednesday, May 27, 2015

The Girl on the TrainThe Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

This was a solid thriller that kept me guessing and reading until its surprise ending. The story is told by three very unlikeable women muddling their way through miserable lives all based on egos, lies and alcoholism. They are characters that would be hard for anyone to care about, but they are expertly developed and their individual twisted points of view combined with the bizarre murder makes the story a compelling, suspenseful read. It loses a star for unnecessary bad language, but the audio version is so well done it gained that star back. The voices for Megan and Rachel were awesome. I loved their accents and I think they did a phenomenal job. Anna's voice, however, was annoying.

View all my reviews
Station ElevenStation Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

dysyopian novels. . . meh. I never quite got into this and wanted it to end sooner than it did. There are many finely crafted characters, a scattered band of survivors, but many of them just disappear from the main storyline. The relationships between those who survive are neatly but not too tidily woven together.

View all my reviews
If I Stay (If I Stay, #1)If I Stay by Gayle Forman
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

This is emotional YA fiction that deals with some serious issues, but Gayle Forman is able to write about it effortlessly. The characters are well developed and their individual stories really make them seem real. I breezed through it wondering what would happen. I liked it and will read the sequel.

quotes from book:
“Sometimes you make choices in life and sometimes choices make you.”
"I realize now that dying is easy. Living is hard."
“I'm not sure this is a world I belong in anymore. I'm not sure that I want to wake up.”
“Don't be scared...Women can handle the worst kind of pain. You'll find out one day.”
“People believe what they want to believe.”


View all my reviews

Tuesday, May 19, 2015

A Night to RememberA Night to Remember by Walter Lord
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

A factual account of the Titanic. A journalist's detailed reporting of what happened according to the survivors. Very thorough. Not my cup of tea, but I am glad I read it. History and nonfiction lovers will give this 5 stars.

View all my reviews
The Land of Mango SunsetsThe Land of Mango Sunsets by Dorothea Benton Frank
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

Quick, light, humorous and predictable romantic fluff about midlife crisis, strengthening family relationships, importance of forgiveness, and reinventing oneself after divorce, life threatening illness, sexual abuse, death &/or other life crises, all of which occur in this very short novel. Unfortunately it tends to give a stamp of approval to casual & unprotected extra marital sex and would hardly inspire any reader to strengthen or renew any spiritual or religious affiliation. Dorothea Benton Frank is a gifted writer, I've read & enjoyed several of her low-country tales and am disappointed she does not use her talents to uplift and strengthen the moral fiber of society. The overall message of the book is: everything happens for a reason, y'all. Absolutely.

View all my reviews
All the Light We Cannot SeeAll the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

I loved this deeply moving and enthralling tale of hope, determination and survival. It is the story of two adolescents growing up during WWII: one a young boy, Werner, who is living in Germany during the rise of German fascism, and the other, Marie-Laure, a blind girl who lives with her father in France during the birth of the French Resistance. Werner is driven by a deep love of science while Marie-Laure is inhabited by the power of books. The story is skillfully crafted as it jumps between perspectives of the two different paths their lives take until their stories and destinies converge.

A philosophical coming-of-age fable, it is a novel that constantly oscillates between the moral uncertainties of life and the chiseled precision of the natural world surrounding both its characters, and its readers. The language is so fantastically precise, and lyrical that the visual images it arouses are astounding. Anthony Doerr does things with verbs that make entire paragraphs sing. It is one of very few novels I've ever read that touches on the horror of war for BOTH sides. It shows what can happen when good people encounter evil, which in itself could have been a depressing, tragic and bleak story under less deft hands, but Doerr guides the narrative into a raw and honest yet uplifting tale of hope, survival and life. I "read" the audio version....excellent.

View all my reviews

Thursday, May 14, 2015

Nowhere But HomeNowhere But Home by Liza Palmer
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

This is a fun, easy, light read, not great literature but what I call a guilty pleasure read.

View all my reviews
David and Goliath: Underdogs, Misfits, and the Art of Battling GiantsDavid and Goliath: Underdogs, Misfits, and the Art of Battling Giants by Malcolm Gladwell
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

The title of this tells you exactly what it is about-- what happens when ordinary people face giants. Whether a Malcolm Gladwell fan or not, this book will not disappoint.

View all my reviews